Schedule

Scheduled Talks

September 7 - 8 | Sat, Sun 8:00 AM - 6 PM MDT

Enjoy talks covering Python Fundamentals, Web, Data Science, DevOps, People, and lots more. A detailed schedule will be updated soon!


Cleaning up your python environment superfund site.
Does your python environment look like randall munroe's (of XKCD fame) python environment superfund site? (https://xkcd.com/1987/) What would happen to your sprint if your laptop got hit by a bus? How can you mitigate that?

Ashton Honnecke

CUDA in your Python: Effective Parallel Programming on the GPU
It's 2019, and Moore's Law is dead. CPU performance is plateauing, but GPUs provide a chance for continued hardware performance gains, if you can structure your programs to make good use of them. In this talk you will learn how to speed up your Python programs using Nvidia's CUDA platform.

William Horton

Stats don't have to be scary: automatic A/B test analysis using Python
Learn how my workplace manages to analyze dozens of concurrent A/B tests with millions of data points! I'll discuss our previous manual analysis process, some things that have changed, and do a down-to-earth walkthrough of how you too can use Python to automate analyzing your tests.

Kristie Wirth

Developing With Empathy
Building software is a team sport, we're told. Yet it's cooperation that makes teams work, and without empathy we can't cooperate. I'll talk about adding care to our code, and raising the bar beyond "just come talk to me if you have a problem".

Rami Chowdhury

Boring Object Orientation
The strengths and weaknesses of Python lend themselves to a different style of object oriented programming. By accepting several constraints on how we design and implement classes, we make our code more robust, more testable, and easier to adapt to changing circumstances.

Moshe Zadka

Optimizing SQL + Python Pipelines for Data Science
Poorly written SQL and Python can make data extraction and manipulation tedious and painful. Streamlined processes utilizing SQL best practices will save hours of frustration. My goal is to teach attendees proven SQL methodologies and what python tools to use when.

Jordan Hagan

To comment or not? A data-driven look at attitudes toward code comments
How can someone who is just learning find the commenting style that is best for them as they learn, grow, & contribute? I did a survey of programmers & will be sharing what we can do to address comment use in a way that encourages a growth mindset and empowers everyone.

Veronica Hanus

Unleashing the Eighth Plague: An Intro to Load Testing with Locust and Python
Puzzling over performance problems in production? Baffling backend bugs bending your brain? Unleash a plague of Locusts on your web app to devour performance problems, permanently! In this talk, you will learn how to leverage Locust for load testing RESTful services and more.

Gabriel Boorse

Using Dash to Create Interactive Web Apps for Non-Technical Audiences
Ever struggle with finding methods to present data visualizations and/or results to non-technical audiences in a coherent and engaging manner? In this talk, I'll detail how I overcame such a challenge by using Dash to build an interactive app for firefighters to use while testing rescue equipment.

Joseph Willi

Advanced asyncio: Solving Real-World Production Problems
By building a simplified chaos monkey service, we will walk through how to create a good foundation for an asyncio-based service, including graceful shutdowns, proper exception handling, and testing asynchronous code. We'll get into the hairier topics as well, covering topics like working with synchronous code, debugging and profiling, and working with threaded code. We'll learn how to approach asynchronous and concurrent programming with Python's asyncio library, take away some best practices, and learn what pitfalls to avoid.

Lynn Root

Keynotes

Python 1994
"Come for the language, stay for the community." The Python community started in 1994 at a NIST workshop in Maryland. What was the world of Python like in its first years? Did we have any clue whatsoever? A joke-focused tour of early Python, heavy on question-and-answer.

Paul Everitt

TBD

Ewa Jodlowska

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